;

labor history


  • Unions Are Essential for Eliminating Racism

    A new study finds that unions don't just increase wages and benefits for workers on the job — union membership is also linked to diminished racist attitudes among white workers. If we want to defeat racism, building strong, democratic unions is essential.



  • The Story Behind the Lee Statue in Richmond, Virginia

    by Peter Rachleff

    Now the time has come for the story of the Workingmen’s Reform Party, the building of Richmond’s City Hall, and the solidarity-based politics of the Black and white members of the Knights of Labor, to come out into the light.


  • The Twisted History of Domestic Military Intervention

    by Alan Singer

    The use of federal troops to enforce domestic law and order has usually served the interests of big business and white supremacy; recent calls to send in the troops are not concerned with protecting freedom.


  • The Great Upheaval of 1877 Sheds Light on Today’s Protests

    by Richard Schneirov

    1877 saw a wave of mass protests and strikes by the urban poor of multiple ethnicities, violent repression by the forces of law and order, and a news media that focused on sensational instances of looting and property damage while ignoring the protesters' complaints about inequality during a brutal economic downturn.



  • 5 Ways to Rebuild Labor and Transform America

    The COVID-19 crisis presents an opportunity for organized labor to fight for a more equitable economy and society, not just better pay and benefits, if the movement learns from historical successes and failures.



  • The Contagion and a Cure

    by Mark Lause

    Mark Lause looks at the 1793 yellow fever pandemic in Philadelphia from a working class history perspective, and finds it informs us today.



  • The Coronavirus Could Rewrite the Rules for Silicon Valley

    by Margaret O'Mara

    The blue-collar workers who power the digital economy — including fulfillment center workers and app-based couriers — are pushing for higher pay and better protection, just as Detroit autoworkers did 90 years ago.



  • Front-Line Workers in the Covid-19 Fight Need Unions

    by William P. Jones

    Without strengthening labor laws, and extending them to all sectors, we cannot ensure workers have the power to protect their own health and safety on the job and the health and safety of our communities.


  • Pandemic Exposes Vulnerabilities of Workers on Farms

    by Verónica Martínez-Matsuda

    Defying the broader conservative political forces of the time, the Farm Security Administration extended health care to tens of thousands of migratory agricultural workers because it understood that farmworkers’ health was vital to the nation’s wellbeing.