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womens history



  • "A League of Their Own" Update Engages Lives of Queer Women in the 1940s

    by Lauren Gutterman

    "The series’ portrait of queer life amid World War II might seem unrealistic to some, but history reveals that queer women and trans men — from butch to femme and married to unmarried — often found opportunities to act on their desires and build queer communities."



  • Witches are Having a Moment in 2022

    by Anna K. Danziger Halperin

    Women have long understood accusations of witchcraft as attacks on their efforts to exert power in their societies. This may explain why women today are embracing the symbol. 



  • Empathy in the Archive: Care and Disdain for Wet Nursing Mothers

    by Anna K. Danziger Halperin

    "Just like today, women’s decisions in the past about how to feed their babies were shaped by personal preference, to be sure, but the possibilities available are bounded by technological innovations, shifting medical advice, and social, cultural, and economic pressures and practices."



  • Black Women's Activism Ties Reproductive Rights to Broader Goals of Freedom

    by Kim Gallon

    Black women's reproductive lives have always been complicated by institutional racism, sexism, and the balance of personal autonomy and racial solidarity. Black feminists have struggled to use the African American press as a space to force discussion of the issues. 



  • "Misogynoir" Exemplified in the Degradation of Black Women Athletes

    by Donald Earl Collins

    The treatment of basketball star Brittney Griner by Russian authorities (and the indifference to her case by many Americans) shows that Black women athletes still have to navigate a world of racism and sexism that diminishes their achievements and their security. 



  • After Four Decades, Iranian Women's Frustrations are Erupting

    by Kelly J. Shannon

    Since the 1990s, Iranian women have been engaged in slowly escalating protest against the restrictions imposed by the Islamic Republic. Have those protests become too large and too public to be contained? 



  • "The Woman King" Softens Truths of the Slave Trade

    by Ana Lucia Araujo

    The film has a delicate task: showing the involvement of the Kingdom of Dahomey in selling other Africans to European slave traders without feeding narratives that blame Africans for the slave trade. It largely sidesteps this history instead. 



  • Where are the Women in History?

    by Amanda B. Moniz

    Women's histories have frequently been written in the past, but in ways that are inaccessible to researchers in the present. One example is the way that women reformers were presented as exemplars of Protestant evangelical rectitude. 



  • The Danger of Encouraging Americans to Inform on Each Other

    by Christine Adams

    Governors like Virginia's Glenn Youngkin are repeating a tactic of despots throughout history: encouraging the public to denounce individuals to the authorities. Whether its witches or teachers, this is a formula for intimidation and conformity. 


  • "Pour Myself a Cup of Ambition": The 1970s Echo in Today's Union Revival

    by Ellen Cassedy and Lane Windham

    This Labor Day, we’re hopeful about the renewed energy and excitement for workplace organizing—especially by women workers—and cautiously optimistic that today’s workers may overcome the sorts of corporate tactics that blocked organizing in the 1970s.