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News at Home


  • Are Campus Bookstores Undermining Student Learning?

    by Elizabeth Stice

    Today’s undergraduates are increasingly being cornered into ongoing financial commitments for everything, while they never take possession of anything. Rejecting digital book programs run by campus bookstores outsourced to third parties could help reverse this trend.


  • Sadly, Hatred is Very Much American

    by Ralph E. Shaffer

    "Lieutenant Cable, and Oscar Hammerstein, had it wrong in "South Pacific."  Americans don't have to be "carefully taught " to hate. Historically, it's been inherent, one generation after another. The only change has been the target."


  • Can Space Exploration Restore American Faith in Science?

    by John Baick

    The 60th anniversary of the first manned space flight is time to reflect on the devolution of space exploration from an expression of science as a public and collective enterprise to a vanity project of fame-seeking billionaires.


  • What Will be the Terms of Racial Forgiveness in America?

    by J. Chester Johnson

    Much of today's antiracist discourse among white Americans resembles what anti-Nazi theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer called "cheap grace" – self-forgivness without cost or atonement for crimes that, while past, nevertheless are deeply present today.


  • Political Precedent for the Trump Cult of Personality

    by Donne Levy

    Their differences in character and personality should not obscure similarities between Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump. Both men's ability to flout the truth and survive serious scandals, plus their dalliances with white racism, make their political careers resemble cults of personality.


  • Paying the Price: Our Veterans and the Burden of Parkinson's Disease

    by Ray Dorsey

    Parkinson's Disease is the fastest-growing brain disease. It affects people worldwide, but American veterans are particularly affected. The nation must recognize the harm caused by chemical exposure and head injury, and commit the resources necessary to help veterans and all those affected. 


  • A Personal and Family History of Encountering Prejudice and Intolerance

    by Ron Steinman

    The author experienced antisemitic prejudice as a college student, but learned more about the pervasiveness of prejudice living in Asia as the husband of a Vietnamese woman during a time of anti-American sentiment, and then when living in suburban America as part of a mixed-race family. While it's necessary to understand the historical roots of racial bigotry, it's also always personal. 


  • What Comes Next?

    by Stephanie Hinnershitz

    In 1979, Asian American leaders testified to Congress about problems of discrimination, opportunity and hostility facing their communities. The official response largely enshrined a "model minority" myth that obscured ongoing problems behind a celebratory narrative of inclusion. Waves of anti-Asian violence in the 1980s belied that story, and warn us not to minimize the climate of hostility Asian Americans face today.


  • Is History Ready to Judge the Trump Presidency?

    by Samuel (Shenger) Zhou

    Understandings of presidential success and failure might have to be revised for Donald Trump; while Trump failed to win reelection, his media tactics will allow him, unlike the previous Republican president George W. Bush, to retain control of his party and remain a national force even out of office. Is this the future of the presidency?