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Historians in the News

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Bouie: Manchin and Sinema Have Their History Wrong

    Bipartisan support for 1960s civil rights legislation was an artifact of a fleeting moment of ideological diversity within the two parties. When it comes to voting and civil rights laws, partisan polarization has been the historical norm, and it's nothing to fear now when ballot access is at risk across the nation.



  • American Education Is Founded on White Race Theory

    In the 1890s the National Education Association worked to standardize the national secondary curriculum, deciding what subjects were worthy of study, and in the process developing a white supremacist curriculum in history. 


  • The Border Patrol Helped Create the "Browning" of America

    The family story of historian Mireya Loza and her father Pedro illustrates an irony of militarized border enforcement: Labor migrants who once contemplated returning to Mexico or Central America were forced to stay in the US and raise American families.



  • Charles Blow: ‘The Lost Cause’ Is Back

    by Charles M. Blow

    "Republicans are on a political crusade to protect lore and lies. They know that many Americans, many of them their voters, will take a lie over guilt and atonement, every day of the week."



  • Revisiting Portland a Year after the Rioting

    Elliott Young, a history professor and police reform advocate, is among the Portand residents interviewed about the state of the city a year after destructive protests over police violence drew the far left, far right, and federal law enforcement to the city. 



  • The Past and Present of the U.S. Postal Service

    Postal historian Philip Rubio joins The Takeaway to discuss new service standards that many fear will undermine the public standing of the Postal Service without meaningfully improving the agency's financial standing. 



  • Yu Ruxin is Rescuing China’s Muzzled Past, One Footnote at a Time

    “We won’t be able to truly absorb the lessons of history, and history may just repeat itself,” Mr. Yu said in an interview from Hong Kong. “It couldn’t possibly be exactly like the Cultural Revolution, but something similar can’t be ruled out.”



  • Daphne Brooks on Truth-Telling Music

    African American Studies scholar Daphne Brooks tells the back stories of Black women in music and the cultural impact of their songs. 



  • Today It’s Critical Race Theory. 200 Years Ago It Was Abolitionist Literature

    In 1829, South Carolina and Georgia responded to a series of fires they assumed were set by enslaved people by banning both the abolitionist literature they blamed for inciting rebellion and the teaching of literacy to slaves. Today's battles over curriculum are likewise about ideas deemed threatening to social hierarchies.



  • Is the US Ready to Stop Being the World's Policeman?

    Historians Daniel Immerwahr and Stephen Wertheim are among the experts quoted on the rise of the idea of American interventionism and its reconsideration after twenty years of the War on Terror. 



  • ‘Historical Distortions’ Test South Korea’s Commitment to Free Speech

    The South Korean government's efforts to police discussion of historical events, aimed at suppressing right-wing theories about the country's democratization movement, are an exceptional example of the tension between allowing free debate and the corrosive effects of conspiracy theories.