;

Roundup

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Why "Woke" is Such a Convenient Dog Whistle for the Right

    by Samuel L. Perry and Eric L. McDaniel

    The term hints at evoking demonized populations—Black and LGBTQ Floridians, for instance—while maintaining enough ambiguity to foster deniability about the consequences of legislation. It also has the auxiliary function of trolling white liberals. 



  • Why We Need Pirates

    by Paul Buhle, Marcus Rediker and David Lester

    Though vilified in popular culture, the history of piracy shows that many crews were egalitarian bands of maritime workers escaping their exploitation at the hands of merchant companies and navies. A new graphic adaptation of a recent history of piracy tells the story. 



  • The Real Failures of January 6

    by Karen J. Greenberg

    Despite surface similarities, the attack on Brazil's government buildings earlier this month differed from January 6, 2021 in one key respect: the transfer of presidential power had already been accomplished. The contrast is sobering—for America. 



  • Fear of a Black Studies Planet

    by Roderick A. Ferguson

    A scholar whose work was named in Florida's decision not to support the AP African American Studies course discusses a long history of conservative efforts to control textbooks and teaching and, failing that, to create politically useful hysteria about indoctrination. 



  • Some Escaped Slavery Without Escaping the South

    by Viola Franziska Müller

    The majority of people escaping slavery before Emancipation never crossed the Mason-Dixon line, finding a measure of freedom in southern cities. 



  • Bolsonaro's Long Shadow

    by Nara Roberta Silva

    The recently departed president is only the latest, and probably not the last, avatar of antidemocratic impulses in Brazilian politics, generally reflected by the elite recruiting the anxieties of the middle class to thwart broader social rights for the nation's poor. 



  • Nobody Has My Condition But Me

    by Beverly Gage

    Presenting with unusual autoimmune symptoms tied to a thus-far unique genetic mutation placed a reseacher and biographer on the other side of being studied. 



  • Miami-Dade has Lurched Right, but Still Loves "Obamacare"

    by Catherine Mas

    Even though conservative Latinos in Miami are generally suspicious of "socialism", the long history of local government support for medical access means that many carve out a big exception for the Affordable Care Act. 



  • Family Histories where Black Power Met Police Power

    by Dan Berger

    Fighting back against mass incarceration today means learning from the stories of Black Power activists who fought against the expansion of police power and surveillance since the 1960s. 



  • College Faculty: After K-12, Curriculum Laws are Coming For You

    by James Grossman and Jeremy C. Young

    State colleges involved with concurrent enrollment programs that allow high school students to take classes for credit are already susceptible to laws purporting to fight "indoctrination" in the secondary school curriculum. More intrusions on academic freedom are coming. 



  • Atlanta's BeltLine Project a Case Study in Park-Driven "Green Gentrification"

    by Dan Immergluck

    Although the ambitious combination of multiuse trails and apartment complexes "was designed to connect Atlantans and improve their quality of life, it has driven up housing costs on nearby land and pushed low-income households out to suburbs with fewer services than downtown neighborhoods."



  • The History of Mexican Americans in Austin

    by Cynthia E. Orozco

    A historian works to develop a chronicle of Mexican American community events in the city of Austin with a local community newspaper.