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human rights



  • Fishing, Not Catching, in the History of the Law

    by John Fabian Witt

    John Fabian Witt writes about a critical exchange over Samuel Moyn's book on humanitarian war, and questions Moyn's conception of the relationship between a scholar's politics and their methodology. 



  • Dosing Arkansas Prisoners with Ivermectin Just Latest Incident of Medical Abuse

    by Lydia Crafts

    "News that an Arkansas prison doctor deceived inmates to take Ivermectin as a COVID preventative shows that nonconsensual research and the experimental use of drugs on vulnerable people remain common — despite evidence of its danger and laws designed to prevent it."



  • Honoring Attica After Half a Century

    by Heather Ann Thompson

    Activists both inside and outside of prisons in the 1960s and 1970s confronted the violence of the state. Accountability for law enforcement is still an unrealized legacy of the 1971 Attica rebellion. 



  • The U.S. Role in the El Mozote Massacre Echoes in Today’s Immigration

    by Nelson Rauda and John Washington

    Renewed efforts to prosecute the perpetrators of the 1981 El Mozote massacre of Salvadoran civilians during the civil war will further demonstrate American involvement in the perpetuation of inequality and violence in Central America and, the authors argue, the hypocrisy of US immigration policy. 



  • Teshuvah: A Jewish Case for Palestinian Refugee Return

    by Peter Beinart

    Peter Beinart argues that the history of the Jewish people and the events of 1948 compel Israeli political leaders and American and world Jewish organizations to recognize a right of return for displaced Palestinians as part of a resolution to the current crisis in East Jerusalem. 



  • Can Guantánamo Ever Be Shut Down?

    by Karen J. Greenberg

    Even if the US's "forever wars" are wound down, it's unclear if the national security state will release its remaining "forever prisoners" at Guantamo Bay. 



  • The Armenian ‘Genocide’: This is What Happened in 1915

    The Polish Jewish Lawyer Raphael Lemkin coined the term "genocide" in part after losing 49 family members to the Holocaust. But he was also motivated by his earlier study of the mass killings of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire. 



  • Argentina’s Military Coup of 1976: What the U.S. Knew

    Newly declassified documents demonstrate that the US government, including Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, were aware of the developing coup and evaluated policy as a balancing of the prospective military dictatorship's friendliness to the US against its likely willingness to commit human rights violations. 



  • The Princeton Historian Mugged by Reality

    Xiyue Wang was released from an Iranian prison in 2019 after being detained for four months. The Princeton doctoral student is now a critic of softening American sanctions aginst Iran.